LERMA UMR8112

Laboratoire d’Études du Rayonnement et de la Matière en Astrophysique et Atmosphères



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Terahertz Instrumentation and Remote Sensing

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It includes research activities in three directions:
- Terahertz instrumentation for ground-based and space telescopes
- Earth remote sensing using multiple satellite observations
- data processing and virtual observations

The Instrument group at LERMA is a key international player in milllimeter to THz components and instrumentation, with active participation in space borne missions within international collaborations. Its main goal is to advance basic knowledge in THz devices, and to develop new technologies or circuit concepts in order to be able to propose some instruments as PI or as a key partner. This group has always worked at the frontier of electronics in terms of frequency and sensitivity. It is specialized in millimeter to THz heterodyne components and receivers, which provides unique insight in the physics and chemistry, in particular of the interstellar medium and the atmosphere of planets, including the Earth.

The Software Instrumental activity of this pole focuses on the modeling of the instrumentation, the processing of the data, and the development of Virtual Observation strategies. The data come both from instruments (e.g., ALMA, NOEMA, Planck, SKA) and from numerical simulations. The activity includes all the aspects and problems related to data consolidation, data storage and perpetuation, data diffusion and sharing.

The Earth and Planet Remote Sensing component revolves around the microwave to millimeter wave radiometry from satellites, for the characterization of the Earth atmosphere and surface. Different aspects are covered, including the analysis of satellite observations, the modeling of the radiative transfer, and the development of inversion methods. It is based on collaboration with the instrument group and projects couple science and instrument studies. The group works on both atmospheric and surface analysis, using microwave observations but also exploring the synergies between visible, infrared and microwave observations. We produce geophysical variables (e.g., soil moisture, inundation extent, emissivity) over long time series at a global scale, or for use by the climate and meteorological communities. We are also involved in the analysis of satellite observations of planet, using similar methodologies.

Séminaires à venir

Vendredi 21 décembre 2018, 14h00
Salle de l'atelier, Paris
Astrochemistry in star forming regions : new modeling approaches
Emeric BRON
LERMA
résumé :
Star-forming regions present rich infrared and millimeter spectra emitted by the gas exposed to the feedback of young stars. This emission is increasingly used to study the star formation cycle in other galaxies, but results from a complex interplay of physical and chemical processes : chemistry in the gas and on grain surfaces, (de)excitation processes of the atoms and molecules, heating and cooling balance,... Its understanding thus requires detailed astrochemical models that include the couplings between these processes. In this talk, I will present several examples where new modeling approaches of specific processes and their couplings proved crucial to solve persistent observational riddles : from the driving role of UV irradiation in the dynamics of photodissociation regions (PDR) to the efficient reformation of molecular hydrogen in these regions.
 
Mardi 15 janvier 2019, 11h00
Salle de l'atelier, Paris
ATTENTION jour ET heure inhabituels
Thresholds for Globular Cluster Formation and their Dominance of Star Formation in the Early-Universe
Bruce ELMEGREEN
IBM Research Division
résumé :
Young massive clusters (YMCs) are usually accompanied by lower-mass clusters and unbound stars with a total mass equal to several tens times the mass of the YMC. If this was also true when globular clusters (GCs) formed, then their cosmic density implies that most star formation before redshift ~2 made a GC that lasted until today. Star-forming regions had to change after this time for the modern universe to be making very few YMCs. Here we consider the conditions needed for the formation of a ~10^6 Msun cluster. These include a star formation rate inside each independent region that exceeds ~1 Msun/yr to sample the cluster mass function up to such a high mass, and a star formation rate per unit area of Sigma_SFR ~ 1 Msun/kpc^2/yr to get the required high gas surface density from the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, and therefore the required high pressure from the weight of the gas. High pressures are implied by the virial theorem at cluster densities. The ratio of these two quantities gives the area of a GC-forming region, ~1 kpc^2, and the young stellar mass converted to a cloud mass gives the typical gas surface density of 500-1000 Msun/pc^2. Observations of star-forming clumps in young galaxies are consistent with these numbers, suggesting they formed today's GCs. Observations of the cluster cut-off mass in local galaxies agree with the maximum mass calculated from Sigma_SFR. Metal-poor stellar populations in local dwarf irregular galaxies confirm the dominant role of GC formation in building their young disks.
 
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